Reports & Toolkits

County Responses to the COVID-19 Pandemic: Child Welfare and Victim Services

  • County Responses to the COVID-19 Pandemic: Child Welfare and Victim Services

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    County Responses to the COVID-19 Pandemic: Child Welfare and Victim Services

    In nine states, county governments have responsibility and authority for administering the child welfare system while others share that responsibility with the state government. County governments are often involved in providing domestic and family violence services. As intimate partners and families with children shelter in place, many are struggling with isolation and the economic impacts of COVID-19 on employment, food access and early childhood supports. Moreover, racial and economic disparities exacerbate these issues.

    During the COVID-19 pandemic, intimate partner violence cases have increased in many counties while child abuse and neglect case have gone down; however, this may be due to decreased contact with mandated reporters, such as early educators and teachers, school officials, nurses, doctors and other medical professionals and mental health providers. Officials expect dramatic spikes in reports when schools and other activities resume. In response, counties are working to expand domestic violence services and promote public health standards for providers offering shelter care. Using telehealth and telecommunications for providing services known for reducing risk factors are critical during this pandemic. Counties are also revising protocols to promote public health standards during in-home visits and investigations.

    Loudoun County, Va.

    In response to Loudoun County’s recent spike in domestic violence hotline calls, its Domestic Abuse Response Team—interagency partners involving law enforcement, community corrections, schools, mental health professionals and other advocacy agencies—have been working collaboratively to address increases during COVID-19. Local courts continue to release and extend protective orders and offer shelter care and advocacy services to victims.

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    Goodhue County, Minn.

    Recognizing the family stressors affecting households as a result of COVID-19, Goodhue County’s child protection staff increased its response to hotline calls by addressing reports that may not meet the criteria for a child maltreatment investigation but the family may show high levels of stress. Staff are conducting family check-ins by phone or video conference to minimize contact and de-escalate problems before they require official investigation. If a home presents a need for higher-level of response, staff will conduct an in-person home visit.

    • Learn More

    The health and safety of residents are paramount for counties. County human services staff are on the frontlines providing essential medical, nutrition and financial assistance and economic supports to children, families and older adults at a critical time in our country and helping to reduce the spread of COVID-19.

    In nine states, county governments have responsibility and authority for administering the child welfare system while others share that responsibility with the state government.
    2020-05-29
    Reports & Toolkits
    2020-05-29

In nine states, county governments have responsibility and authority for administering the child welfare system while others share that responsibility with the state government. County governments are often involved in providing domestic and family violence services. As intimate partners and families with children shelter in place, many are struggling with isolation and the economic impacts of COVID-19 on employment, food access and early childhood supports. Moreover, racial and economic disparities exacerbate these issues.

During the COVID-19 pandemic, intimate partner violence cases have increased in many counties while child abuse and neglect case have gone down; however, this may be due to decreased contact with mandated reporters, such as early educators and teachers, school officials, nurses, doctors and other medical professionals and mental health providers. Officials expect dramatic spikes in reports when schools and other activities resume. In response, counties are working to expand domestic violence services and promote public health standards for providers offering shelter care. Using telehealth and telecommunications for providing services known for reducing risk factors are critical during this pandemic. Counties are also revising protocols to promote public health standards during in-home visits and investigations.

Loudoun County, Va.

In response to Loudoun County’s recent spike in domestic violence hotline calls, its Domestic Abuse Response Team—interagency partners involving law enforcement, community corrections, schools, mental health professionals and other advocacy agencies—have been working collaboratively to address increases during COVID-19. Local courts continue to release and extend protective orders and offer shelter care and advocacy services to victims.

Goodhue County, Minn.

Recognizing the family stressors affecting households as a result of COVID-19, Goodhue County’s child protection staff increased its response to hotline calls by addressing reports that may not meet the criteria for a child maltreatment investigation but the family may show high levels of stress. Staff are conducting family check-ins by phone or video conference to minimize contact and de-escalate problems before they require official investigation. If a home presents a need for higher-level of response, staff will conduct an in-person home visit.

The health and safety of residents are paramount for counties. County human services staff are on the frontlines providing essential medical, nutrition and financial assistance and economic supports to children, families and older adults at a critical time in our country and helping to reduce the spread of COVID-19.

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About Ashleigh Holand (Full Bio)

Director of Programs and Practices

Ashleigh Holand is the Director of Programs and Practices for the NACo County Innovations Lab. She oversees the organization’s grant-funded programs that help counties across the country improve community outcomes on key local issues including early childhood development, public health, criminal justice, economic mobility and resilience.

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  • Associate Program Director – Children, Youth and Families  
    (202) 942-4251

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