COVID-19 Vaccine Resource Hub

  • COVID-19 Vaccine Resource Hub

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    COVID-19 Vaccine Resource Hub

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    • Background & Resources
    • COVID-19 Vaccine Funding

    Counties invest heavily in local residents' health and well-being and have been on the front lines of our nation’s response to the coronavirus pandemic. Counties support over 900 hospitals, 824 long-term care facilities and 1,943 local health departments- entities that will play an integral role in the distribution of a COVID-19 vaccine. This toolkit is aimed at providing counties the information and resources needed to plan for and equitably distribute the COVID-19 vaccine at the local level.

    Track: COVID Vaccine Mandates

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    Track: COVID Vaccine Administration

    • Doses administered per 100k residents
    • Doses distributed per 100k residents
    • Doses distributed
    • People with at least one dose
    • Vaccine hesitancy

    Background and Resources

    About the Vaccines

    COVID-19 Vaccine Tracker

    Vaccine Manufacturer Vaccine Type Development Stage Booster Shot Approval Estimated Start of Distribution Dosage Requirement

    BioNTech SE/ Pfizer

    mRNA Received Full FDA Approval on 8/23/21 FDA approved for individuals age 65+ and high risk on 9/22/21

    In progress

    Two-dose

    Moderna

    mRNA Received FDA EUA Approval on 12/18/20 Application submitted to FDA In progress Two-dose
    AstraZeneca/Oxford

    Viral vector

    Not currently authorized for use in U.S. N/A N/A Two-dose
    Janssen Pharmaceuticals (Johnson & Johnson) Viral vector

    Received FDA EUA Approval on 2/28/21

    Application submitted to FDA In progress Single-dose
    Novavax

    Protein adjuvant

    Not yet applied to the FDA for EUA

    N/A N/A Two-dose
    Sanofi/GlaxoSmithKline

    Protein adjuvant

    Phase 3
    N/A Late 2021 Two-dose

     

    County Role in Vaccine Distribution

    As gatekeepers of the local health and human service safety net, counties have played an essential role in the development and implementation of vaccination programs.

    The County Role in Vaccination Program Implementation

     

    1. Leveraging Local Expertise. According to profile data from the National Association of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO), most local health departments provide direct immunization services; 90 percent offer adult immunizations and 88 percent offer childhood immunizations. These departments therefore have a solid foundation of expertise in planning and administering vaccine and immunization programs. Counties must advocate that states leverage this experience and expertise to ensure COVID-19 vaccination planning efforts make best use of established practices and resources for implementation.

    2. Increasing Vaccine Confidence. Vaccine confidence is defined as the trust that parents, patients, or providers have in recommended vaccines, the providers administering those vaccines, and the processes and policies that lead to the development, licensure, manufacturing and recommendations for use.[1] County officials and local public health agencies must work directly with individuals in their communities to address vaccine hesitancy, combat vaccine misinformation, and increase vaccine confidence.

    3. Advocating for Necessary Resources. A survey conducted in June of 2020 by NACCHO revealed that immunization programs in local health departments were the most impacted by COVID-19 through the redirection of funding and the loss of staff. The findings also suggested that while the majority of local health departments (71%) are prepared to give COVID vaccines, they will need additional resources to do so.

    [1] National Association of County and City Health Officials (2020). Local public health: an integral partner for increasing vaccine confidence. Retrieved September 22, 2020 from https://www.naccho.org/uploads/full-width-images/factsheet_Local-Public-Health-Increasing-

    Vaccine-Confidence_july-2020.pdf

    Vaccine Hesitancy Best Practices & Resources

    Counties play a critical role in informing unvaccinated citizens about the safety and efficacy of vaccines, encouraging them to get vaccinated, and working to address access barriers.

    Vaccine hesitancy has decreased nationwide in recent months, however as NACo’s County Explorer tool shows, estimates of vaccine hesitancy differ greatly across counties and there are still high rates of hesitancy in some regional and geographical areas which include rural and farming communities, and amongst particular population groups such republicans, as African Americans, and young women.

    Some common reasons unvaccinated people have cited for their hesitancy include:

    • Long-term or short-term side effects
    • Mistrust of government and political leaders
    • Indifference to being vaccinated

    Effective methods in addressing these concerns include:

    • Empowering trusted messengers to listen to people who are hesitant
    • Disseminating accurate and digestible information that is tailored to the audience
    • Answering questions people have about vaccines

    Resources

    Federal Resources
    • The COVID-19 Community Corps (HHS)
    • Vaccine Hesitancy for COVID-19: State, County, and Local Estimates (HHS/ASPE)
    • How to Build Healthcare Personnel’s Confidence in COVID-19 Vaccines (CDC)
    • Rapid Community Assessment Guide (CDC)
    • Vaccinate With Confidence (CDC)
    Additional Resources
    • Poll: The Language of Vaccine Acceptance (de Beaumont Foundation)
    • Local Public Health: An Integral Partner for Increasing Vaccine Confidence (NACCHO)
    • Building Vaccine Confidence Through Community Engagement (American Psychological Association)
    • County COVID-19 Vaccine Communication Plans (NACo)
    Target Populations
    • Resource Guide for Faith-Based and Community-Based Organizations Fighting COVID-19 (HHS)
    • Rural Communities Toolkit (HHS)
    • Parents of Adolescents Toolkit (HHS)

    Examples

    Orange County, FL                                           Orange County launched its “I Got My Shot” safety campaign to disprove vaccine myths, highlight trusted messengers, and encourage citizens to get vaccinated. The campaign, which partnered with local organizations, encouraged people to share their reasons for getting vaccinated on social media, enabled residents to request access to the county’s mobile vaccination unit, and created a website that answered FAQs.
    Shelby County, TN Shelby County, in partnership with local organizations and community members, is leading a grassroots canvassing effort to directly communicate with populations in zip codes with low rates of vaccination. The canvassers will distribute free masks and brochures that answer frequently asked questions about the vaccines and describe how to get vaccinated.
    Jackson County, MO Jackson County has partnered with University of Missouri–Kansas City to create Our Healthy KC Eastside, a program aimed at addressing vaccine hesitancy and increasing rates of vaccination in socially vulnerable portions of the county. The recently formed partnership will engage community members with COVID-19 education opportunities and work to increase access to vaccines for the targeted communities.
    Lewis County, WA Lewis County’s “Why I Got Vaccinated” video campaign enables local leaders to describe why they elected to get vaccinated, allowing residents to hear personal messages from trusted members of the community. The first video included the personal testimony of Christine Moloney, Chehalis, WA’s school superintendent.
    Fairfax County, VA The county collects and shares data on vaccine hesitancy using Community Data Platform's Survey Solution. The data includes breakdowns by different demographics and shows what populations are eager, hesitant and vulnerable to receiving or not receiving vaccinations.

    County Communication Plans

    As the nation endeavors to take on an unprecedented rollout of the COVID-19 vaccine, counties will play a critical role in both planning vaccine distribution efforts, and ensuring residents get vaccinated.

    Research findings indicate that nearly a third of the U.S. population is hesitant to get the COVID-19 vaccine, and rates of hesitancy are even higher amongst minority groups.

    Additionally, vaccine disinformation and misinformation that has continued to plague local communities and contribute to hesitancy and distrust and will jeopardize rates of inoculation, and efforts to end the current public health emergency. The daunting task of overcoming these challenges and building public confidence in the COVID-19 vaccine, lays primarily on local government officials- who must develop effective communication strategies that reach all segments of their resident populations.

    County elected and appointed officials are trusted public servants in their communities, with the ability to leverage existing partnerships with a variety of stakeholders to rapidly disseminate information through a range of channels. Never has this responsibility been as important as it is now, as the need for effective communication to combat vaccine hesitancy and distrust is essential for the success of this operation.

    View the NACo Brief: County COVID-19 Vaccine Communication Plans

    KEY COMPONENTS

    Communication toolkits developed by federal agencies like the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, alongside scientists and researchers have outlined several distinct elements of vaccine communication strategies that may assist with improving vaccine confidence in local communities:

    1. Identify appropriate messengers and vaccine champions that have a trusted voice in the community.
    2. Tailor messages for a variety of different audiences and produce targeted messaging for vulnerable populations.
    3. Lead with facts and transparency to increase public trust.
    4. Listen to concerns and adjust messaging as necessary to address the feedback.

    Many counties have incorporated these strategies into their COVID-19 communication plans for residents. The following sections summarize components of several county plans that have been implemented across the U.S. thus far.

    HENNEPIN COUNTY, MINN.

     

    Hennepin County has created a comprehensive communications plan to build vaccine confidence. To do so, the county has first focused on essential workers and those in congregate care settings. Given the existing vaccine confidence in many of these individuals, the county intends to reinforce messaging from state and federal officials and focus its efforts on advertising vaccination Points of Dispensing (PODs). In late spring, the county will turn its attention towards older adults, individuals with preexisting medical conditions, underserved communities, and uninsured/underinsured persons.

    To reinforce and reframe confidence in the vaccine, the county plans to rely on the following “key messages”:

    Three principles will guide vaccine distribution:

    1. Maximize immediate health benefits and minimize serious illnesses, deaths and harm created by COVID-19.
    2. Equitable distribution and access
    3. (ransparency and speedy information sharing with residents

    Minnesota is taking a regional approach to vaccine distribution through the creation of 25 “hub” sites that directly receive federal vaccine deliveries.

    Not every factor of vaccine distribution is within Minnesota’s control

    Until vaccines are available for everyone, we all need to continue to adhere to public health guidelines to protect ourselves and our communities.

    To reach each audience, the county plans to share the messages listed above through diverse media outlets as well as influential leaders and organizations in underserved communities. It also intends to circulate footage of residents receiving vaccinations and leverage vaccine confidence programs of national, state and local partners within the community. This includes PR campaigns of public sector (e.g. CDC, NIH or the Governor’s Office) and private sector groups, such as The Ad Council, AMA, state health care associations and local hospitals.

     

    COCONINO COUNTY, ARIZ.

     

    The vaccine communications campaign established by Coconino County first targets frontline healthcare workers and long-term care facilities and residents followed by a focus on the general public. Coconino County has structured its campaign into three phases:

    • Pre-distribution of vaccine (RUN 1)
    • Vaccine distribution launch (RUN 2)
    • During Vaccine distribution (RUN 3)

    During RUN 1, the county aims to build trust in the vaccine, generate excitement around returning to “normalcy” and emphasize personal responsibility to protect oneself and their communities. This phase of the campaign will target both high-priority groups and county residents with messages on the safety and efficacy of the vaccine.

    RUN 2 will aim to educate high-priority groups and the general public on details related to the vaccine. This includes information on vaccine eligibility and timelines, side effects, the need for two doses and vaccination sites. The county will also roll out a “#SleeveUp #MaskUp #WashUp” social media campaign during RUN

    During its final “RUN 3” phase, the county will continue to educate its residents on vaccine-related information and introduce a “Conquer COVID” campaign that emphasizes the need for two doses and to bring insurance cards when being vaccinated although the vaccine is cost-free.

    To facilitate this campaign and amplify its message across the county, Coconino County will utilize social media platforms (e.g. Facebook, Twitter, Instagram), produced and live videos, traditional media and the county website. The county began its communications campaign on December 15 and will continue to run this program through 2021.

    MECKLENBURG COUNTY, N.C.

     

    Aimed at providing education on COVID-19 prevention and vaccination, Mecklenburg County’s vaccination communication plan targets the entire county population with a focus on priority groups and diverse communities. To execute its campaign, Mecklenburg County has divided its efforts between two audiences: (1) the general population and (2) populations that are historically vaccine resistant, hesitant and hard to reach.

    By using county channels, radio, print media, news media, social media and web and digital platforms, the County intends to amplify four key messages:

    1. You can protect yourself and others by wearing masks, washing your hands and staying home;
    2. Prioritize vaccines;
    3. The vaccine is safe and reliable;
    4. Where and how residents can get vaccinated

    Mecklenburg County has structured its outreach in two stages. First, it will conduct grassroots outreach and mass paid outreach by working with faith groups, community organizations and nontraditional communications tools (e.g. clean graffiti, door hangers, community workshops, etc.). In Stage 2, the county will turn to radio, print, digital and social media to promote vaccine safety and efficacy. County officials will identify “community influencers” to participate in vaccine promotional content through videos and interviews.

    Internally, the county intends to facilitate its campaign through its Joint Information Center, Emergency Operations Center, Public Health Department and Public Information Department. The county will also partner with local entities, such as hospitals, EMS and neighboring municipalities and cities.

    RESOURCES

    Federal Resources

    • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s How to Build Confidence in COVID-19 Vaccines: A Short Guide for Immunization Coordinators in Medical Centers and Clinics

    Partner Resources

    • American Hospital Association’s COVID-19 Vaccine Communications Toolkit
    • de Beaumont Foundation’s Changing the COVID Conversation Communications Cheat Sheet
    • ZenCity’sReady, Set, Vaccinate: A Guide for Local Governments on How to Take Control of the COVID-19 Vaccine Narrative in Your Community

    Vaccine Booster Readiness Checklist for County Health Facilities

    New guidance from the CDC allows individuals who are at the highest risk for COVID-19 to receive a booster shot to help protect against the virus as the Delta variant continues to spread and COVID-19 cases increase throughout the nation. A booster shot refers to a vaccine given to someone who built enough protection after completing an initial series of vaccinations, but that protection has decreased over time. COVID-19 booster shots are provided to individuals in accordance with all requirements and recommendations from the FDA, CDC, and the CDC Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP)

    Booster Shot Eligibility

    As of October, the federal recommendation for a booster shot only applies to the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine (Click here for the CDC statement), and availability is limited to those individuals deemed at high risk of infection. These individuals include:

    • Individuals 65 years of age and older
    • Individuals at high risk of severe COVID-19 
    • Individuals in high risk occupational and institutional settings

    Guidance for Local Administration

    The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) created a resource to help local health centers assess their readiness to administer COVID-19 booster shots. The resource outlines several key steps which include:

    1. Staying connected by keeping up to date with the latest federal guidance (See below for list of resources)
    2. Preparing data collection systems to support new requirements and ensuring that processing and scheduling systems are up to date and have capacity to handle traffic increases.
    3. Ensure staffing levels are adequate and that staff are trained and in compliance with COVID-19 safety protocol.  
    4. Develop and refine communication and education strategies for patients, particularly those in vulnerable and high-risk populations that continues to focus on increasing vaccine confidence and combatting mis-information.
    5. Track and monitor supply trends to anticipate changes in inventory.

     Click here to view full checklist.

    Resources

    • CDC COVID-19 Vaccination Provider Support Webpage
    • COVID-19 Vaccine Booster Shot Eligibility (CDC)
    • COVID-19 Vaccine Booster Planning Checklist (HRSA)
    • Find a COVID-19 Vaccine Near You (CDC)
    • Individuals Considered at High Risk (CDC)
    • Building Confidence in COVID-19 Vaccines (CDC)

    Vaccine Administration, Documentation & Reporting

    Each vaccination provider site is required to report certain data elements for each dose administered and within 24 hours of the administration. Required data elements include detailed information about the vaccine administration site, as well as information about the vaccine recipient (see page 53 of the CDC playbook for full list of discreet data elements).

    While provider sites may use approved Immunization Information Systems (IIS) or other external systems for tracking, all vaccine administration data must be reported to the CDC’s Immunization Data Lake. The CDC recommends that jurisdictions assess the capability of COVID-19 vaccination providers to meet federal and jurisdiction-specific reporting requirements before or upon enrollment, which includes ensuring that sites have trained staff, necessary equipment, and internet access.

    In addition to reporting vaccine administration, vaccination sites and jurisdictions must implement processes to track first and second vaccine dosages for those vaccines requiring boosters. The information systems being used to track the vaccine administration must also be able to exchange data with other jurisdiction’s systems and/or the CDC ‘s Immunization Data Lake to obtain immunization history, if applicable.

    Key consideration for counties:

    • Assess the vaccine provider site’s ability (staff capacity, necessary equipment, and internet access) to adhere to CDC’s data reporting requirements. Report resource needs to your jurisdiction project manager.

    Federal and Partner Resources

    • We Can Do This National COVID-19 Public Education Campaign Resources
    • Communications and Vaccine Confidence
    • General Information on Vaccine Development, Storage and Handling
    • Distribution Planning for Local Governments
    • FAQs

    COVID-19 Vaccine Funding

    Text in italics indicates funding being directed to local governments.
    Find the latest information and resources related to the COVID-19 vaccine.
    2020-10-21
    Basic page
    2021-10-15
Jump to Section

Counties invest heavily in local residents' health and well-being and have been on the front lines of our nation’s response to the coronavirus pandemic. Counties support over 900 hospitals, 824 long-term care facilities and 1,943 local health departments- entities that will play an integral role in the distribution of a COVID-19 vaccine. This toolkit is aimed at providing counties the information and resources needed to plan for and equitably distribute the COVID-19 vaccine at the local level.

Track: COVID Vaccine Mandates

 

Track: COVID Vaccine Administration

Background and Resources

About the Vaccines

COVID-19 Vaccine Tracker

Vaccine Manufacturer Vaccine Type Development Stage Booster Shot Approval Estimated Start of Distribution Dosage Requirement

BioNTech SE/ Pfizer

mRNA Received Full FDA Approval on 8/23/21 FDA approved for individuals age 65+ and high risk on 9/22/21

In progress

Two-dose

Moderna

mRNA Received FDA EUA Approval on 12/18/20 Application submitted to FDA In progress Two-dose
AstraZeneca/Oxford

Viral vector

Not currently authorized for use in U.S. N/A N/A Two-dose
Janssen Pharmaceuticals (Johnson & Johnson) Viral vector

Received FDA EUA Approval on 2/28/21

Application submitted to FDA In progress Single-dose
Novavax

Protein adjuvant

Not yet applied to the FDA for EUA

N/A N/A Two-dose
Sanofi/GlaxoSmithKline

Protein adjuvant

Phase 3
N/A Late 2021 Two-dose

 

County Role in Vaccine Distribution

As gatekeepers of the local health and human service safety net, counties have played an essential role in the development and implementation of vaccination programs.

The County Role in Vaccination Program Implementation

 

1. Leveraging Local Expertise. According to profile data from the National Association of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO), most local health departments provide direct immunization services; 90 percent offer adult immunizations and 88 percent offer childhood immunizations. These departments therefore have a solid foundation of expertise in planning and administering vaccine and immunization programs. Counties must advocate that states leverage this experience and expertise to ensure COVID-19 vaccination planning efforts make best use of established practices and resources for implementation.

2. Increasing Vaccine Confidence. Vaccine confidence is defined as the trust that parents, patients, or providers have in recommended vaccines, the providers administering those vaccines, and the processes and policies that lead to the development, licensure, manufacturing and recommendations for use.[1] County officials and local public health agencies must work directly with individuals in their communities to address vaccine hesitancy, combat vaccine misinformation, and increase vaccine confidence.

3. Advocating for Necessary Resources. A survey conducted in June of 2020 by NACCHO revealed that immunization programs in local health departments were the most impacted by COVID-19 through the redirection of funding and the loss of staff. The findings also suggested that while the majority of local health departments (71%) are prepared to give COVID vaccines, they will need additional resources to do so.


[1] National Association of County and City Health Officials (2020). Local public health: an integral partner for increasing vaccine confidence. Retrieved September 22, 2020 from https://www.naccho.org/uploads/full-width-images/factsheet_Local-Public-Health-Increasing-

Vaccine-Confidence_july-2020.pdf

Vaccine Hesitancy Best Practices & Resources

Counties play a critical role in informing unvaccinated citizens about the safety and efficacy of vaccines, encouraging them to get vaccinated, and working to address access barriers.

Vaccine hesitancy has decreased nationwide in recent months, however as NACo’s County Explorer tool shows, estimates of vaccine hesitancy differ greatly across counties and there are still high rates of hesitancy in some regional and geographical areas which include rural and farming communities, and amongst particular population groups such republicans, as African Americans, and young women.

Some common reasons unvaccinated people have cited for their hesitancy include:

  • Long-term or short-term side effects
  • Mistrust of government and political leaders
  • Indifference to being vaccinated

Effective methods in addressing these concerns include:

  • Empowering trusted messengers to listen to people who are hesitant
  • Disseminating accurate and digestible information that is tailored to the audience
  • Answering questions people have about vaccines

Resources

Federal Resources
Additional Resources
Target Populations

Examples

Orange County, FL                                           Orange County launched its “I Got My Shot” safety campaign to disprove vaccine myths, highlight trusted messengers, and encourage citizens to get vaccinated. The campaign, which partnered with local organizations, encouraged people to share their reasons for getting vaccinated on social media, enabled residents to request access to the county’s mobile vaccination unit, and created a website that answered FAQs.
Shelby County, TN Shelby County, in partnership with local organizations and community members, is leading a grassroots canvassing effort to directly communicate with populations in zip codes with low rates of vaccination. The canvassers will distribute free masks and brochures that answer frequently asked questions about the vaccines and describe how to get vaccinated.
Jackson County, MO Jackson County has partnered with University of Missouri–Kansas City to create Our Healthy KC Eastside, a program aimed at addressing vaccine hesitancy and increasing rates of vaccination in socially vulnerable portions of the county. The recently formed partnership will engage community members with COVID-19 education opportunities and work to increase access to vaccines for the targeted communities.
Lewis County, WA Lewis County’s “Why I Got Vaccinated” video campaign enables local leaders to describe why they elected to get vaccinated, allowing residents to hear personal messages from trusted members of the community. The first video included the personal testimony of Christine Moloney, Chehalis, WA’s school superintendent.
Fairfax County, VA The county collects and shares data on vaccine hesitancy using Community Data Platform's Survey Solution. The data includes breakdowns by different demographics and shows what populations are eager, hesitant and vulnerable to receiving or not receiving vaccinations.

County Communication Plans

As the nation endeavors to take on an unprecedented rollout of the COVID-19 vaccine, counties will play a critical role in both planning vaccine distribution efforts, and ensuring residents get vaccinated.

Research findings indicate that nearly a third of the U.S. population is hesitant to get the COVID-19 vaccine, and rates of hesitancy are even higher amongst minority groups.

Additionally, vaccine disinformation and misinformation that has continued to plague local communities and contribute to hesitancy and distrust and will jeopardize rates of inoculation, and efforts to end the current public health emergency. The daunting task of overcoming these challenges and building public confidence in the COVID-19 vaccine, lays primarily on local government officials- who must develop effective communication strategies that reach all segments of their resident populations.

County elected and appointed officials are trusted public servants in their communities, with the ability to leverage existing partnerships with a variety of stakeholders to rapidly disseminate information through a range of channels. Never has this responsibility been as important as it is now, as the need for effective communication to combat vaccine hesitancy and distrust is essential for the success of this operation.

View the NACo Brief: County COVID-19 Vaccine Communication Plans

KEY COMPONENTS

Communication toolkits developed by federal agencies like the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, alongside scientists and researchers have outlined several distinct elements of vaccine communication strategies that may assist with improving vaccine confidence in local communities:

  1. Identify appropriate messengers and vaccine champions that have a trusted voice in the community.
  2. Tailor messages for a variety of different audiences and produce targeted messaging for vulnerable populations.
  3. Lead with facts and transparency to increase public trust.
  4. Listen to concerns and adjust messaging as necessary to address the feedback.

Many counties have incorporated these strategies into their COVID-19 communication plans for residents. The following sections summarize components of several county plans that have been implemented across the U.S. thus far.

HENNEPIN COUNTY, MINN.

 

Hennepin County has created a comprehensive communications plan to build vaccine confidence. To do so, the county has first focused on essential workers and those in congregate care settings. Given the existing vaccine confidence in many of these individuals, the county intends to reinforce messaging from state and federal officials and focus its efforts on advertising vaccination Points of Dispensing (PODs). In late spring, the county will turn its attention towards older adults, individuals with preexisting medical conditions, underserved communities, and uninsured/underinsured persons.

To reinforce and reframe confidence in the vaccine, the county plans to rely on the following “key messages”:

Three principles will guide vaccine distribution:

  1. Maximize immediate health benefits and minimize serious illnesses, deaths and harm created by COVID-19.
  2. Equitable distribution and access
  3. (ransparency and speedy information sharing with residents

Minnesota is taking a regional approach to vaccine distribution through the creation of 25 “hub” sites that directly receive federal vaccine deliveries.

Not every factor of vaccine distribution is within Minnesota’s control

Until vaccines are available for everyone, we all need to continue to adhere to public health guidelines to protect ourselves and our communities.

To reach each audience, the county plans to share the messages listed above through diverse media outlets as well as influential leaders and organizations in underserved communities. It also intends to circulate footage of residents receiving vaccinations and leverage vaccine confidence programs of national, state and local partners within the community. This includes PR campaigns of public sector (e.g. CDC, NIH or the Governor’s Office) and private sector groups, such as The Ad Council, AMA, state health care associations and local hospitals.

 

COCONINO COUNTY, ARIZ.

 

The vaccine communications campaign established by Coconino County first targets frontline healthcare workers and long-term care facilities and residents followed by a focus on the general public. Coconino County has structured its campaign into three phases:

  • Pre-distribution of vaccine (RUN 1)
  • Vaccine distribution launch (RUN 2)
  • During Vaccine distribution (RUN 3)

During RUN 1, the county aims to build trust in the vaccine, generate excitement around returning to “normalcy” and emphasize personal responsibility to protect oneself and their communities. This phase of the campaign will target both high-priority groups and county residents with messages on the safety and efficacy of the vaccine.

RUN 2 will aim to educate high-priority groups and the general public on details related to the vaccine. This includes information on vaccine eligibility and timelines, side effects, the need for two doses and vaccination sites. The county will also roll out a “#SleeveUp #MaskUp #WashUp” social media campaign during RUN

During its final “RUN 3” phase, the county will continue to educate its residents on vaccine-related information and introduce a “Conquer COVID” campaign that emphasizes the need for two doses and to bring insurance cards when being vaccinated although the vaccine is cost-free.

To facilitate this campaign and amplify its message across the county, Coconino County will utilize social media platforms (e.g. Facebook, Twitter, Instagram), produced and live videos, traditional media and the county website. The county began its communications campaign on December 15 and will continue to run this program through 2021.

MECKLENBURG COUNTY, N.C.

 

Aimed at providing education on COVID-19 prevention and vaccination, Mecklenburg County’s vaccination communication plan targets the entire county population with a focus on priority groups and diverse communities. To execute its campaign, Mecklenburg County has divided its efforts between two audiences: (1) the general population and (2) populations that are historically vaccine resistant, hesitant and hard to reach.

By using county channels, radio, print media, news media, social media and web and digital platforms, the County intends to amplify four key messages:

  1. You can protect yourself and others by wearing masks, washing your hands and staying home;
  2. Prioritize vaccines;
  3. The vaccine is safe and reliable;
  4. Where and how residents can get vaccinated

Mecklenburg County has structured its outreach in two stages. First, it will conduct grassroots outreach and mass paid outreach by working with faith groups, community organizations and nontraditional communications tools (e.g. clean graffiti, door hangers, community workshops, etc.). In Stage 2, the county will turn to radio, print, digital and social media to promote vaccine safety and efficacy. County officials will identify “community influencers” to participate in vaccine promotional content through videos and interviews.

Internally, the county intends to facilitate its campaign through its Joint Information Center, Emergency Operations Center, Public Health Department and Public Information Department. The county will also partner with local entities, such as hospitals, EMS and neighboring municipalities and cities.

RESOURCES

Federal Resources

Partner Resources

Vaccine Booster Readiness Checklist for County Health Facilities

New guidance from the CDC allows individuals who are at the highest risk for COVID-19 to receive a booster shot to help protect against the virus as the Delta variant continues to spread and COVID-19 cases increase throughout the nation. A booster shot refers to a vaccine given to someone who built enough protection after completing an initial series of vaccinations, but that protection has decreased over time. COVID-19 booster shots are provided to individuals in accordance with all requirements and recommendations from the FDA, CDC, and the CDC Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP)

Booster Shot Eligibility

As of October, the federal recommendation for a booster shot only applies to the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine (Click here for the CDC statement), and availability is limited to those individuals deemed at high risk of infection. These individuals include:

  • Individuals 65 years of age and older
  • Individuals at high risk of severe COVID-19 
  • Individuals in high risk occupational and institutional settings

Guidance for Local Administration

The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) created a resource to help local health centers assess their readiness to administer COVID-19 booster shots. The resource outlines several key steps which include:

  1. Staying connected by keeping up to date with the latest federal guidance (See below for list of resources)
  2. Preparing data collection systems to support new requirements and ensuring that processing and scheduling systems are up to date and have capacity to handle traffic increases.
  3. Ensure staffing levels are adequate and that staff are trained and in compliance with COVID-19 safety protocol.  
  4. Develop and refine communication and education strategies for patients, particularly those in vulnerable and high-risk populations that continues to focus on increasing vaccine confidence and combatting mis-information.
  5. Track and monitor supply trends to anticipate changes in inventory.

 Click here to view full checklist.

Resources

Vaccine Administration, Documentation & Reporting

Each vaccination provider site is required to report certain data elements for each dose administered and within 24 hours of the administration. Required data elements include detailed information about the vaccine administration site, as well as information about the vaccine recipient (see page 53 of the CDC playbook for full list of discreet data elements).

While provider sites may use approved Immunization Information Systems (IIS) or other external systems for tracking, all vaccine administration data must be reported to the CDC’s Immunization Data Lake. The CDC recommends that jurisdictions assess the capability of COVID-19 vaccination providers to meet federal and jurisdiction-specific reporting requirements before or upon enrollment, which includes ensuring that sites have trained staff, necessary equipment, and internet access.

In addition to reporting vaccine administration, vaccination sites and jurisdictions must implement processes to track first and second vaccine dosages for those vaccines requiring boosters. The information systems being used to track the vaccine administration must also be able to exchange data with other jurisdiction’s systems and/or the CDC ‘s Immunization Data Lake to obtain immunization history, if applicable.

Key consideration for counties:

  • Assess the vaccine provider site’s ability (staff capacity, necessary equipment, and internet access) to adhere to CDC’s data reporting requirements. Report resource needs to your jurisdiction project manager.

Federal and Partner Resources

COVID-19 Vaccine Funding

Text in italics indicates funding being directed to local governments.

Contact

  • Associate Legislative Director – Health  
    (202) 942-4246

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