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NACo Analysis: H.R. 7575, the Water Resources Development Act of 2020

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    NACo Analysis: H.R. 7575, the Water Resources Development Act of 2020

    The Water Resources Development Act (WRDA) legislation authorizes water resource studies and projects and sets policies for navigation, flood control, hydropower, recreation, water supply and emergency management for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Army Corps). Since 2014, this legislation has been passed on a biennial basis and addresses county interests related to ports, inland waterways, levees, dams, wetlands, watershed and coastal restoration. Each of the 2014, 2016 and 2018 water resources bill were enacted into law on a bipartisan basis, and lawmakers are expected to consider and pass a WRDA bill this year in the same bipartisan fashion. The most recent water resources law P.L. 115‐270, the America’s Water Infrastructure Act of 2018 (AWIA 2018), is set to expire on September 30, 2020. The Continuing Resolution passed by the U.S. House of Representatives on September 22 did not extend the authorizations in the underlying law.

    As major owners, users and regulators of water resources and systems with the responsibility for funding 95 percent of all local public water infrastructure needs, counties are directly impacted by the policies and funding authorized under WRDA for the Army Corps. To achieve our shared goals, counties often partner with the Army Corps to improve local water infrastructure. Additionally, counties invest $134 billion annually in the construction of infrastructure and the maintenance and operation of public works, including public water systems and water infrastructure projects.

    The Water Resources Development Act (WRDA) legislation authorizes water resource studies and projects and sets policies for navigation, flood control, hydropower, recreation, water supply and emergency management for the U.S.
    2020-10-14
    Document
    2020-10-14

The Water Resources Development Act (WRDA) legislation authorizes water resource studies and projects and sets policies for navigation, flood control, hydropower, recreation, water supply and emergency management for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Army Corps). Since 2014, this legislation has been passed on a biennial basis and addresses county interests related to ports, inland waterways, levees, dams, wetlands, watershed and coastal restoration. Each of the 2014, 2016 and 2018 water resources bill were enacted into law on a bipartisan basis, and lawmakers are expected to consider and pass a WRDA bill this year in the same bipartisan fashion. The most recent water resources law P.L. 115‐270, the America’s Water Infrastructure Act of 2018 (AWIA 2018), is set to expire on September 30, 2020. The Continuing Resolution passed by the U.S. House of Representatives on September 22 did not extend the authorizations in the underlying law.

As major owners, users and regulators of water resources and systems with the responsibility for funding 95 percent of all local public water infrastructure needs, counties are directly impacted by the policies and funding authorized under WRDA for the Army Corps. To achieve our shared goals, counties often partner with the Army Corps to improve local water infrastructure. Additionally, counties invest $134 billion annually in the construction of infrastructure and the maintenance and operation of public works, including public water systems and water infrastructure projects.

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