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Workforce Development Month: ARPA workforce investments in manufacturing and technology

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    Workforce Development Month: ARPA workforce investments in manufacturing and technology

    According to research conducted by the Manufacturing Institute, the U.S. lost nearly a decade of manufacturing job growth, or 1.4 million jobs, due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Though around 820,000 were recovered by the end of 2020, there are still around 600,00 who have not. This loss of talent is compounded with several other factors, including an aging workforce with skills that are not easily replaced and a shrinking pool of younger candidates who view the industry as a compelling career choice.

    While the tech industry has expanded in terms of job openings and employment, the industry continues to face issues in equity. While women currently make up half of the STEM workforce, they remain highly underrepresented in certain job clusters. Currently, women only make up 14 percent of the software engineering workforce and 25 percent of computer science-related jobs. Additionally, Black workers only make up 9 percent of the STEM workforce, while Hispanic workers only make up 8 percent.

    As employers of more than 3.6 million workers, counties are continuing to use their American Rescue Plan (ARPA) State and Local Fiscal Recovery Funds (Recovery Funds) to train America’s workforce to meet the demands of infrastructure jobs, supporting rising projects in broadband, transportation, technology, clean water and energy. Keeping our nation’s economy moving, counties are investing in post-secondary education partnerships and targeted sectoral training programs.

    In celebration of Workforce Development Month, the National Association Of Counties (NACo) is highlighting critical investments counties have made using their ARPA funds in workforce development. This week, NACo is highlighting workforce investments counties have made to enhance and expand our manufacturing and technology workforce.

    Franklin County, Ohio

    This year, the Franklin County Ohio Board of Commissioners allocated $4.5 million of their Recovery Funds to launch a new Tech Women of Color workforce training initiative.

    The Tech Women of Color initiative is a 15-week program that will offer technical skills training, financial coaching, and more. Participants will take part in paid internships and graduate with industry-recognized credentials, making them ready to compete for high-paying, in-demand technology jobs. In addition to employment placement services, graduates will also receive ongoing supportive services to help navigate the “benefits cliff,” which occurs when a small increase in earnings leads to loss of public assistance benefits.

    Technical skills training will be provided by the nationally recognized training nonprofit PerScholas, while supportive services and employment placement will be run through the Franklin County Department of Job and Family Services.  With current funding levels, Franklin County is aiming to train and place at least 200 low-income women of color into good-paying tech jobs by August 2024.

    Dakota County, Minn.

    Dakota County, Minn. Invested $250,000 of their Recovery Funds into their new Workforce Mobility Program. The program will provide short-term training for those looking to enter the workforce, and for those who are already employed looking for additional skills in high-demand fields in Dakota County.

    Training will be offered for free at the Dakota County Technical College and Inver Hills Community College in high-demand fields including transportation and manufacturing through courses in welding, truck driving, and boiler operations. Interest in the program has been high, with over 200 applications in less than four months. The Workforce Mobility program will provide enhanced support for underserved communities, fill critical sector jobs, low-risk access to post-secondary education, and increase collaboration between public and private sectors in Dakota County.

    Gloucester County, N.J.

    Gloucester County, N.J. has invested $600,000 of its Recovery Funds towards a partnership with the  Rowan College of South Jersey and the Gloucester County Institute of Technology, a four-year vocational-technical public high school in the county, to implement the New Jersey Economic Development Authority (NJEDA) Wind Turbine Technician Training Program.

    Through the Wind Turbine Technician Training Program, training and certificates will be provided for a range of skill levels. Students can start as early as high school with the ability to stack certificates and degrees to advance themselves in the industry. Specifically, the program can prepare:

    • Workers trained in basic fabrication and assembly
    • Turbine technicians with certificates or associate degrees
    • Engineering technologists in electrical or mechanical disciplines; and
    • Mechanical, civil, and electrical engineers with specialized wind power certifications

    Recruitment efforts will focus on women, minorities, individuals on Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), nontraditional adult students and those living in distressed communities.

    To view more ways counties are investing their Recovery funds, you can view NACo’s Local Government ARPA Investment Tracker. Counties can participate in NACo’s Workforce Development series by sharing their ARPA investments in workforce development and job training through this link here.

    According to research conducted by the Manufacturing Institute, the U.S.
    2022-09-22
    Blog
    2022-09-22
Counties are continuing to utilize Recovery Funds to invest in workforce development to develop and enhance our technology and manufacturing workforce Several counties have leveraged Recovery Funds to create new internships, technical training courses, and post-secondary education partnerships

According to research conducted by the Manufacturing Institute, the U.S. lost nearly a decade of manufacturing job growth, or 1.4 million jobs, due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Though around 820,000 were recovered by the end of 2020, there are still around 600,00 who have not. This loss of talent is compounded with several other factors, including an aging workforce with skills that are not easily replaced and a shrinking pool of younger candidates who view the industry as a compelling career choice.

While the tech industry has expanded in terms of job openings and employment, the industry continues to face issues in equity. While women currently make up half of the STEM workforce, they remain highly underrepresented in certain job clusters. Currently, women only make up 14 percent of the software engineering workforce and 25 percent of computer science-related jobs. Additionally, Black workers only make up 9 percent of the STEM workforce, while Hispanic workers only make up 8 percent.

As employers of more than 3.6 million workers, counties are continuing to use their American Rescue Plan (ARPA) State and Local Fiscal Recovery Funds (Recovery Funds) to train America’s workforce to meet the demands of infrastructure jobs, supporting rising projects in broadband, transportation, technology, clean water and energy. Keeping our nation’s economy moving, counties are investing in post-secondary education partnerships and targeted sectoral training programs.

In celebration of Workforce Development Month, the National Association Of Counties (NACo) is highlighting critical investments counties have made using their ARPA funds in workforce development. This week, NACo is highlighting workforce investments counties have made to enhance and expand our manufacturing and technology workforce.

Franklin County, Ohio

This year, the Franklin County Ohio Board of Commissioners allocated $4.5 million of their Recovery Funds to launch a new Tech Women of Color workforce training initiative.

The Tech Women of Color initiative is a 15-week program that will offer technical skills training, financial coaching, and more. Participants will take part in paid internships and graduate with industry-recognized credentials, making them ready to compete for high-paying, in-demand technology jobs. In addition to employment placement services, graduates will also receive ongoing supportive services to help navigate the “benefits cliff,” which occurs when a small increase in earnings leads to loss of public assistance benefits.

Technical skills training will be provided by the nationally recognized training nonprofit PerScholas, while supportive services and employment placement will be run through the Franklin County Department of Job and Family Services.  With current funding levels, Franklin County is aiming to train and place at least 200 low-income women of color into good-paying tech jobs by August 2024.

Dakota County, Minn.

Dakota County, Minn. Invested $250,000 of their Recovery Funds into their new Workforce Mobility Program. The program will provide short-term training for those looking to enter the workforce, and for those who are already employed looking for additional skills in high-demand fields in Dakota County.

Training will be offered for free at the Dakota County Technical College and Inver Hills Community College in high-demand fields including transportation and manufacturing through courses in welding, truck driving, and boiler operations. Interest in the program has been high, with over 200 applications in less than four months. The Workforce Mobility program will provide enhanced support for underserved communities, fill critical sector jobs, low-risk access to post-secondary education, and increase collaboration between public and private sectors in Dakota County.

Gloucester County, N.J.

Gloucester County, N.J. has invested $600,000 of its Recovery Funds towards a partnership with the  Rowan College of South Jersey and the Gloucester County Institute of Technology, a four-year vocational-technical public high school in the county, to implement the New Jersey Economic Development Authority (NJEDA) Wind Turbine Technician Training Program.

Through the Wind Turbine Technician Training Program, training and certificates will be provided for a range of skill levels. Students can start as early as high school with the ability to stack certificates and degrees to advance themselves in the industry. Specifically, the program can prepare:

  • Workers trained in basic fabrication and assembly
  • Turbine technicians with certificates or associate degrees
  • Engineering technologists in electrical or mechanical disciplines; and
  • Mechanical, civil, and electrical engineers with specialized wind power certifications

Recruitment efforts will focus on women, minorities, individuals on Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), nontraditional adult students and those living in distressed communities.

To view more ways counties are investing their Recovery funds, you can view NACo’s Local Government ARPA Investment Tracker. Counties can participate in NACo’s Workforce Development series by sharing their ARPA investments in workforce development and job training through this link here.

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    <p>Economic mobility refers to changes in an individual&rsquo;s economic status over a lifetime and across generations&mdash;usually measured in income.

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    Responsible for all matters pertaining to housing, community and economic development, public works, and workforce development including the creation of affordable housing and housing options for different populations, residential, commercial, and industrial development, and building and housing codes. Policy Platform & Resolutions 2022-2023 2022 NACo Legislative Priorities
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    <p>Responsible for all matters pertaining to housing, community and economic development, public works, and workforce development including the creation of affordable housing and housing options for different populations, residential,

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