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USDA invests nearly $2 billion in additional funding for food banks and school meal programs

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    USDA invests nearly $2 billion in additional funding for food banks and school meal programs

    On September 14, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) announced that it will provide nearly $2 billion in additional funding to food banks and school meal programs for purchasing American-grown foods. According to USDA, the additional support will help these organizations endure supply chain challenges and elevated food costs as they continue to provide nutritious foods to kids and families in need.

    The funds, provided through USDA’s Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC) will be used in three ways:

    1. Nearly $1 billion to purchase and distribute food to emergency food providers through The Emergency Food Assistance Program (TEFAP). Through TEFAP, USDA purchases a variety of nutritious, high-quality, domestically sourced and produced foods and makes those foods available to state agencies. States provide the food to local emergency food banks and other organizations that counties partner with such as soup kitchens and food pantries that directly serve the public. These local organizations then distribute the USDA foods to eligible recipients for household consumption or use them to prepare and serve meals in a congregate setting.

    2. Nearly $500 million to expand the Local Food Purchase Assistance (LFPA) cooperative agreement program. LFPA currently supports 49 states, 4 territories and 33 tribes to purchase food from historically underserved producers as well as local and regional producers to support emergency food assistance efforts.

    3. Nearly $500 million for schools across the country to purchase food for their lunch and breakfast programs. These Supply Chain Assistance funds, which will support school districts with purchasing domestic food products such as fresh fruit, milk, cheese, frozen vegetables and ground meat, will be allocated to schools based on student enrollment, with a minimum amount per district.

    Counties are key partners with the federal government in developing, implementing and administering food and nutrition programs that combat hunger at the local level. Across the nation, county governments are leading efforts to transform local food systems and provide support to local food production and community organizations that organize food drives. Counties are also responsible for directly appropriating funds to support K-12 schools in Alaska, Maryland, North Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia, meaning in those states we are responsible for supporting the National School Lunch Program, National School Breakfast program and Seamless Summer Option.

    NACo will continue to track USDA and other federal actions that strengthen the supply chain and make nutritious food more accessible to children and families. We look forward to the announcement of the new national strategy to end hunger at the upcoming White House Conference on Hunger, Nutrition, and Health.

    ADDITIONAL RESOURCES 

    • NACo Blog: USDA releases annual food security report highlighting ongoing importance of federal nutrition programs
    • NACo Blog: USDA awards grants to improve reach and resiliency of emergency food system
    • NACo Submission for the White House Conference on Hunger, Nutrition and Health
    • NACo Report: The County Human Services and Education Landscape
    • NACo Legislative Toolkit for Counties: Priorities for Strengthening the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)
    • NACo Workshop: Strengthening Anti-Hunger Resources through the 2023 Farm Bill
    • NACo Press Release: Counties Welcome White House Focus on Hunger, Nutrition
    • NACo Blog: President Biden Announces White House Conference on Hunger, Health and Nutrition
    On September 14, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) announced that it will provide nearly $2 billion in additional funding to food banks and school meal programs for purchasing American-grown foods.
    2022-09-19
    Blog
    2022-09-19
USDA investing close to $2 billion in additional funding for food banks and school meal programs to purchase locally grown foods County governments are committed to combatting food insecurity by investing local dollars in the charitable food system and administering federal food assistance programs

On September 14, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) announced that it will provide nearly $2 billion in additional funding to food banks and school meal programs for purchasing American-grown foods. According to USDA, the additional support will help these organizations endure supply chain challenges and elevated food costs as they continue to provide nutritious foods to kids and families in need.

The funds, provided through USDA’s Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC) will be used in three ways:

1. Nearly $1 billion to purchase and distribute food to emergency food providers through The Emergency Food Assistance Program (TEFAP). Through TEFAP, USDA purchases a variety of nutritious, high-quality, domestically sourced and produced foods and makes those foods available to state agencies. States provide the food to local emergency food banks and other organizations that counties partner with such as soup kitchens and food pantries that directly serve the public. These local organizations then distribute the USDA foods to eligible recipients for household consumption or use them to prepare and serve meals in a congregate setting.

2. Nearly $500 million to expand the Local Food Purchase Assistance (LFPA) cooperative agreement program. LFPA currently supports 49 states, 4 territories and 33 tribes to purchase food from historically underserved producers as well as local and regional producers to support emergency food assistance efforts.

3. Nearly $500 million for schools across the country to purchase food for their lunch and breakfast programs. These Supply Chain Assistance funds, which will support school districts with purchasing domestic food products such as fresh fruit, milk, cheese, frozen vegetables and ground meat, will be allocated to schools based on student enrollment, with a minimum amount per district.

Counties are key partners with the federal government in developing, implementing and administering food and nutrition programs that combat hunger at the local level. Across the nation, county governments are leading efforts to transform local food systems and provide support to local food production and community organizations that organize food drives. Counties are also responsible for directly appropriating funds to support K-12 schools in Alaska, Maryland, North Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia, meaning in those states we are responsible for supporting the National School Lunch Program, National School Breakfast program and Seamless Summer Option.

NACo will continue to track USDA and other federal actions that strengthen the supply chain and make nutritious food more accessible to children and families. We look forward to the announcement of the new national strategy to end hunger at the upcoming White House Conference on Hunger, Nutrition, and Health.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES 

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    <h3><strong>Counties Matter in Human Services</strong></h3>

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    Human Services & Education Steering Committee

    All matters pertaining to children’s issues, foster care,  public assistance and income support, services to senior citizens and individuals with disabilities, immigration policy, social services, and elementary, secondary and post-secondary education. Policy Platform & Resolutions 2022-2023 2022 NACo Legislative Priorities
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    <p>All matters pertaining to children&rsquo;s issues, foster care,&nbsp; public assistance and income support, services to senior citizens and individuals with disabilities, immigration policy, social services, and elementary,

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