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U.S. House of Representatives holds hearing on the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)

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    U.S. House of Representatives holds hearing on the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)

    On April 28, the U.S. House Committee on Agriculture held a hearing on the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). The hearing, convened by Committee Chair David Scott (D-Ga.) and Ranking Member Glenn Thompson (R-Pa.), focused on opportunities for legislative improvement, while maintaining program integrity and fostering innovation.  

    SNAP, formerly known as food stamps, is a federally funded safety net program that provides monthly grocery benefits to low-income individuals and families. Approximately 70 percent of SNAP beneficiaries are children, aging adults and adults with disabilities. SNAP was reauthorized along with other food and agriculture programs in the 2018 Farm Bill, which is set to expire on September 30, 2023. Though SNAP is an entitlement program, it still receives funding annually through the congressional appropriations process and is reauthorized every five years as part of the Farm Bill.  

    SNAP and other safety net programs are critical to struggling families, lifting many out of poverty while effectively and efficiently stimulating the economy during times of downturn and natural disasters. SNAP supports the full continuum of our food production and distribution systems and boosts the local economy, generating $1.50 for every $1 invested in the program. Additionally, SNAP participation has been shown to improve children’s overall health status, boost school performance and enhance their economic outcomes.  

    As the front line of the social safety net, county governments are essential partners in administering, operating and supporting SNAP and other food assistance programs and benefit from increased federal investment and program flexibility. Counties administer SNAP in 10 states representing 31 percent of all program participants and often contribute significant levels of local funds to meet the administrative and supplemental costs of running the program. 

    As Congress works to reauthorize SNAP in the 2023 Farm Bill, counties urge our federal partners to support policies that will strengthen food security within our communities.  

    Additional Resources

    • NACo Policy Brief: Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) Reauthorization and Appropriations
    • NACo Legislative Toolkit: Priorities for Strengthening the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)
    • NACo Toolkit: The County Human Services and Education Landscape
    • NACo Letter of Support: Extension in SNAP Flexibilities
    On April 28, the U.S. House Committee on Agriculture held a hearing on the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). The hearing, convened by Committee Chair David Scott (D-Ga.) and Ranking Member Glenn Thompson (R-Pa.), focused on opportunities for legislative improvement, while maintaining program integrity and fostering innovation.
    2022-05-03
    Blog
    2022-05-03
House hearing reviews the bipartisan 2018 Farm Bill provisions related to SNAP and discusses program improvements in preparation for the 2023 Farm Bill SNAP, the nation’s largest federal nutrition program, reduces food insecurity by providing monetary grocery benefits to low-income individuals and families Counties support strengthening SNAP and other federal nutrition programs to ensure they effectively meet the needs of our residents

On April 28, the U.S. House Committee on Agriculture held a hearing on the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). The hearing, convened by Committee Chair David Scott (D-Ga.) and Ranking Member Glenn Thompson (R-Pa.), focused on opportunities for legislative improvement, while maintaining program integrity and fostering innovation.  

SNAP, formerly known as food stamps, is a federally funded safety net program that provides monthly grocery benefits to low-income individuals and families. Approximately 70 percent of SNAP beneficiaries are children, aging adults and adults with disabilities. SNAP was reauthorized along with other food and agriculture programs in the 2018 Farm Bill, which is set to expire on September 30, 2023. Though SNAP is an entitlement program, it still receives funding annually through the congressional appropriations process and is reauthorized every five years as part of the Farm Bill.  

SNAP and other safety net programs are critical to struggling families, lifting many out of poverty while effectively and efficiently stimulating the economy during times of downturn and natural disasters. SNAP supports the full continuum of our food production and distribution systems and boosts the local economy, generating $1.50 for every $1 invested in the program. Additionally, SNAP participation has been shown to improve children’s overall health status, boost school performance and enhance their economic outcomes.  

As the front line of the social safety net, county governments are essential partners in administering, operating and supporting SNAP and other food assistance programs and benefit from increased federal investment and program flexibility. Counties administer SNAP in 10 states representing 31 percent of all program participants and often contribute significant levels of local funds to meet the administrative and supplemental costs of running the program. 

As Congress works to reauthorize SNAP in the 2023 Farm Bill, counties urge our federal partners to support policies that will strengthen food security within our communities.  

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