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Trump Administration pushes for Dakota Access Pipeline

Photo Source: Flickr user Karl-Ludwig Poggemann

On February 7, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) granted the final easement permit needed to complete construction on the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL), a 1,172-mile pipeline that would carry crude oil across four states. The decision came just two weeks after President Trump released a January 24 presidential memorandum that instructed all federal agencies involved with the DAPL project to accelerate the review process.

The project originally was delayed after the parent company of the construction, Energy Transfer Partners LP, failed to receive a Corps permit for pipeline construction in North Dakota. Additionally, last September, President Obama stopped construction of DAPL after nationwide protests over potential environmental risks from leaks and spills.

On February 8, the Corps waived any further study and granted the easement necessary to complete DAPL, allowing construction to start immediately. Two days later, the Standing Rock Sioux and Cheyenne River Sioux tribes challenged the move in court. However, on February 13, a federal judge in the U.S. District Court in Washington D.C. denied their request for an emergency order to halt DAPL construction. The judge stated that he will revisit the case at a hearing on February 27.

For more information, contact Julie Ufner at 202.942.4214 or jufner@naco.org